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Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

1 edition of Douglas-fir tussock moth in the Western United States found in the catalog.

Douglas-fir tussock moth in the Western United States

by United States. Department of Agriculture

  • 44 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pseudotsuga menziesii,
  • Orgyia pseudotsugata,
  • Insect control,
  • Plant damage,
  • Biological Sciences

  • Edition Notes

    Dec 1987.

    SeriesProgram aid -- 1401, Program aid (United States. Department of Agriculture) -- 1401.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25673329M

    Douglas-Fir tussock moth has been most prevalent in our landscape trees but is also in forested areas on Cheyenne Mountain and on Rampart Range Road. Spruce budworm has surged in forested areas such as Cheyenne Cañon, Cheyenne Mountain and along Rampart Range Road. It can also move into our landscape Spruce and Fir trees. Tussock moth, (family Lymantriidae), any of a group of moths (order Lepidoptera), the common name for which is derived from the hair tufts, or tussocks, found on most larval family, which occurs in both Eurasia and the New World, includes several species that are destructive to shade and forest trees: the gypsy moth (q.v.; Lymantria dispar), browntail moth (Nygmia phaeorrhoea), satin.

      The whitemarked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma J.E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Lymantriinae), is common in fields, woodlands, and forests of the eastern United States and Canada but occurs as far west as Alberta, Colorado, and Texas (Furniss and Carolin , Wagner ).Larvae feed on at least species of woody host species, including virtually all woody tree and understory Author: T D Schowalter. Spraying against tussock moths works, but it’s hard to know if and when to start. The recent Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak in Methow Valley forests did less damage than expected, according to Forest Service entomologist Connie Mehmel. The progression of the outbreak highlighted the difficulties in determining when it’s appropriate to spray.

      Identification of parasites of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, based on adults, cocoons, and puparia by Torgersen, Torolf R. cn; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.); United Service. cn.   The Forest Service is worried about an outbreak of Douglas fir tussock moths this year. The species is indigenous to the area but can be a major defoliator and a threat to public health. Forest Service Public Affairs Officer Holly Krake says new data on tussock moth egg masses shows they will need to utilize a natural bio-control in high-use.


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Douglas-fir tussock moth in the Western United States by United States. Department of Agriculture Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM) is a defoliating caterpillar that can severely damage Douglas-fir, true fir, and spruce trees in the western United States. In eastern Washington, outbreaks are cyclical and may cause top kill, growth loss, and may kill up to 40% of host trees in an infested stand.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a native defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and true firs (Abies spp.), though will rarely feed on planted Colorado blue spruce in urban areas. The moth is a native species found throughout mixed-conifer forests in the western United States and southern British Columbia.

Orgyia pseudotsugata, the Douglas-fir tussock moth, is a moth of the subfamily Lymantriinae first described by James Halliday McDunnough in It is found in western North America. It is found in western North : Insecta. qf Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM, Orgyia pseudotsugata) in the western United States.

Millions of acres are susceptible to DFTM defoliation, but Early Warning System monitoring focuses attention only on the relatively limited areas where outbreaks may be developing. The Early Warning System is a pheromone-based trapping system used to detect outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM, Orgyia pseudotsugata) in the western United States.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDun-nough) is an important defoliator of true firs and Douglas-fir in Wesern North America. Severe tussock moth outbreaks have oc-Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet 86 U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth Boyd E.

Wickman, Richard R. Mason and Galen C. Trestle1. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a common and periodically destructive solitary defoliator. Occasionally, localized outbreaks occur on individual or small groups of Douglas-fir or spruce in urban settings both on the coast and in the interior.

Key words: tussock moth, subalpinefir, defoliators, ~-fil; UtahfiJrests, forest insects. The Douglas-firtussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough) is a significant defoliator ofDouglas-firand true firs through­ out its host range in western North America.

Tussock moth outbreaks on the Wasatch­ Cache National Forest, UT, from Cited by: 1. Periodic outbreaks of the Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) in forests of western North America generally end with a sudden collapse due Cited by: 8. Genotypic variation among Douglas-fir tussock moth nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpNPV) isolates in the western United States.

Introduction. The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is a native defoliator of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissen) Franco) and several true firs (Abies spp.) in the interior dry-belt coniferous forests of western North America ( Cited by: 8.

Lymantria means "destroyer", and several species are important defoliators of forest trees, including the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar, the Douglas-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata, and the nun moth Lymantria monacha. They tend to have broader host plant ranges than most : Insecta.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), is an important defoliator of spruce, Douglas-fir, true fir and other conifers in the Rocky Mountain region. Feeding by the larvae can cause complete defoliation of heavily infested trees. Damage usually appears first in the tops of trees and progresses downward, sometimes over several years.

trends and larger scale increasing tussock moth activity in surrounding western states. Life History and Population Dynamics Outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth are • cyclical, occurring at 7- to year intervals in the western United States (Mason and Luck ).

The tussock moth is considered a "fast cycling" insect, where populations. THE DOUGLAS-FIR TUSSOCK MOTH The Problem, Alternatives, and Impacts Oregon State University Extension Service California, and others in western United States and Canada.

The present infestation is the largest since the outbreak that occurred in. Mason, R.R. Dynamic behavior of Douglas-fir tussock moth populations in the Pacific Northwest.

Forest Science. Mason, R.R.; Paul, H.G. Monitoring larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and western spruce budworm on permanent plots: sampling methods and statistical properties of data. Gen. Tech. Rep. PNW-GTRCited by: 5. Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is in the “tussock moth” subfamily Lymantriinae, which includes the non-native and much more destructive gypsy moth.

Unlike gypsy moths, the tussock moth is native to western North America and its outbreaks are a natural part of dry forest ecosystems in the West. Early warning system for Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks in the western United States.

Western Journal of Applied Forestry - New Window; Mason, R.R. Sequential sampling of Douglas-fir tussock moth populations. USDA Forest Service Ressearch Note PNW 11pages. - New Window; Mason, R.R. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Program (DFTM) The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a destructive native defoliator of Douglas-fir.

Outbreaks of tussock moth occur every ten to twelve years causing significant damage and mortality to Douglas-fir stands in the interior of the province. Web Search Engines for Articles on "Douglas-fir Tussock Moth" WorldCat; Google Scholar; Google Books; Bumble Bees of the Western United States Butterflies and Moths of North America Douglas-fir Tussock Moth — Orgyia pseudotsugata.

Montana Field Guide. Montana Natural Heritage Program. Retrieved on May. fir tussock moth outbreaks in the western United States. Western Journal of Applied Forestry Objective: To monitor increasing densities of O. pseudotsugata using a system of pheromone-baited traps in sentinel plots throughout the western USA.

Abstract: Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDonnough), is a.Tussock Moths. Home - Other Field Guides. Kingdom Family - Tussock Moths - Lymantriidae.

Species. Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata. Other Names: Douglas Fir Tussock Moth. Information on this Species is incomplete Rusty Tussock Moth Bumble Bees of the Western United States; Butterflies and Moths of North America.spread significantly because the female tussock moth cannot fly.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM; Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir and true firs in the western United States.

Tussock moths occur in most forests in Oregon, but episodes of severe defoliation have been mostly restricted to the Blue.